Tasmanian 20th century Modernism

Documenting Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism - Change, Death and Celebration

I’ve been on a photographic journey over the past few weeks travelling around Tasmania capturing quality photographs for my Tasmanian Modernism website and blog. I really loved writing my last blog about the history of the Launceston General Hospital, if you haven’t seen that post you can check it out here. It brought home what’s important to me - storytelling through my own experiences, photography and archives about Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism.. The relaunch of the Tasmanian 20th Century website and blog has motivated me in so many ways. Most recently I’ve been out and about travelling around Tasmania capturing old favourites with the benefits of what I’ve learnt since picking up my SLR all those years ago. It’s been a wonderful experience, waking up and working for days on end from dawn to dusk capturing quality moments to share.

One of the things I thought about when waking up in the dark and staying out until dawn is how much has changed over the past 15 or so years of documenting for the project. I’ve not only changed and grown as a photographer, but many buildings and places have changed. Sadly, many have been, since I originally captured them, altered beyond original recognition. Tragically many have been demolished too. Most recently a beautiful Art Deco residence was demolished for flats, I only became aware of this when I drove past to document them. Thankfully I captured photographs of it whilst it was still standing, and I look forward to sharing this and many other lost buildings with in future posts. So much change happens within the world of architecture, design and out cities and towns, yet there are so many wonderful examples of Modernism with us in Tasmania still. Documenting these wonderful buildings and creating awareness of the importance of this period in Tasmanian history is what continues to drive me and my passion. Looking back on all my achievements it makes me grateful that I’ve captured so much and continue to do so to this day. We are but specs in time and change is constant. The need to document these places becomes all the more powerful to me knowing that nothing is certain, only change. This process drives me to constantly document, so there is a quality record for posterity.

The Wonderful Art Deco design that is Duncan House in Launceston. This is a photograph taken from my phone of the back of my camera preview screen - live on the shoot. Being out on the road and travelling Tasmania has provided a wonderful opportunity to capture old favourites, new buildings I’ve not captured before and reflect on those buildings, since starting the project have been demolished.

The Wonderful Art Deco design that is Duncan House in Launceston. This is a photograph taken from my phone of the back of my camera preview screen - live on the shoot. Being out on the road and travelling Tasmania has provided a wonderful opportunity to capture old favourites, new buildings I’ve not captured before and reflect on those buildings, since starting the project have been demolished.

New Home for Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism Website and Blog

This year marks 10 years since starting my blog about Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism. Over this time I’ve produced over 400 blog posts, travelled thousands of kilometres making photographs in the pursuit of telling the story of Tasmanian Modernism.

The work I’ve undertaken of raising awareness of this period of Tasmanian design has been shared through my blog, website and social media channels. It’s funny to think that Instagram wasn’t even a thing when I started blogging. My work from this project has also been published in publications including magazines, academic books as well as well as radio and newspaper interviews.

I have been using the Blogger platform for 10 years to share these stories about my passion for Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism. In early 2019 I reworked my entire website creating a fresh modern platform to share my vast artistic and commercial portfolios. This new direction has provided me with the imputes to continue creating new content for my Tasmanian Modernism project and the ability to integrate it into my new website creates a strong design “flow” showcasing all my work in one location. Click here to check out the new website for Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism, let me know what you think.

One of my goals for 2019 for the Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism project is going through my catalogue and remastering photographs I've taken including new interpretations of old photographs. Over the past decade I've learnt so much creatively and technically about the craft of photography and about Tasmanian Modernism. It will be a joy to look back upon and reinterpret my portfolio of images.

As I begin the process of editing the project photographs I’ll be posting them onto my new website dedicated to the Tasmanian Modernism project. Here you will find all my project photos categorised into galleries relating to their use such as industry, commercial and Government etc. I have also created a section titled “In Focus” which showcases large scale and/or long term projects I've worked on that have more than just a few photographs. The website at present has just launched, coupled with remastering my huge back catalogue. In time I hope for the website and blog to provide a wonderful resource for everything relating to Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism.

Thank you for all your support over the last 10 years, it's been a wonderful journey so far, and I'm excited for what's to come.

Click here to check out the new website for Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism, let me know what you think.

I am still leaving the old blog site online with 10 years worth of posts, so if you would like to view these you can do so here


A new look website and blog for my passion for documenting Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism. Click above to see the view the new website

A new look website and blog for my passion for documenting Tasmanian 20th Century Modernism. Click above to see the view the new website